Curly vs. Kinky: Which would YOU prefer?

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This appears to be a sensitive topic amongst the natural hair community, and I can totally see why. There is alot of talk and debate surrounding the two hair categories.

Do you think that one curl type is preferred over the other when it comes to the standard of beauty in the black community? While dating? While posting pictures on Instagram, waiting to get a whole bunch of likes?

So a couple days ago, I saw Taren Guy, YouTuber, Owner and CEO of Luv and Learn your Hair, receive a very angry comment on one of her photos regarding her “loose curl patterned long hair” and how she is considered more privileged due to her curlier hair texture.

 

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…Yeah. Somebody’s mad.

Now you guys know me. I see these crazy, controversial posts and comments and it always gets my mind RACING.

Lately, I find that theres alot of debate and discussion amongst the natural hair community on the difference between curly hair and kinky hair and why it matters. Some people prefer the perfect “curl”, or may have some biases in regard to achieving that perfect curl. There are people who love to embrace their “kinky” hair, and others who get OH SO OFFENDED when you call their hair kinky. Personally, I think all hair is beautiful and no I am not trying to be oh so politically correct. We have to get to a place where we love our hair, and we are not ashamed of how it sprouts, whether its coily, wavy, or whatever.

But my thoughts are as such: Whats is the distinction between the two? Are the light skinned, looser curl patterned naturalista’s more privileged than the Type 4 naturals? Why is there so much talk about it, and so much shade? ***Palm trees.

Now, from an informational, technical standpoint, the difference between the two textures is basically, curly hair is simply a spiral or a wave, while kinky hair is an actual twist in which the hair strands turn around itself.

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You can find more information on blackgirllonghair.com. 

Now when I first began my natural hair journey, I have to be honest. THE ONLY VLOGGERS I WATCHED WERE THE ONES WITH THE LOOSER CURL PATTERN. No one else. There, I said it. (Please don’t come after me in the comment section LOL)

It wasn’t that I didn’t love my “kinkier”, 4a texture or wanted to explore it. It was simply that I was trying to get my hair to look like someone elses. I was insecure during the beginning stages of my natural hair journey. I wanted it to be curly. I wanted it to be defined. Shoot, I was a new natural and I just wanted my hair to look perfect.

A couple months into my natural hair journey, I began to follow different naturalista’s on Instagram, Twitter and YouTube and noticed how BEAUTIFUL the kinkier textures were. Naturalista’s such as Strawberricurls, Mahogany Curls who is now a Natural Hair expert for Essence magazine and all these beautiful women who embrace their different textures. I started to discover that some people have different curl patterns and textures on one head, while others have the same curl pattern and texture, yet cannot wear different styles, or their hair may break easily. All these sudden realizations and discoveries began to come to the forefront and I am like WHOA. Wait, your natural hair isn’t supposed to be perfect? Say what? Thank God. Now I can finally breathe. LOL

I say all this to say, all hair textures and patterns are indeed beautiful. Please excuse the cliche, but they are.

When we get to a place in our natural hair journey in which we truly embrace that aspect of our natural hair journey, we will be some bad mama jamas. Taking over the world, one “curl” or “kink” at a time.

Hope you found this interesting and of benefit! If you guys have any comments, thoughts, or any ideas of what I should post next, please share your comments below. Make sure to subscribe via email if you haven’t already! 🙂

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Always remember: You are Fearfully, Wonderfully and “Beautifully mane.”

 

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Do you know your porosity level?

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What is hair porosity? Porosity is basically your hairs ability to retain mositure and absorb water and can be measured many different ways. One of the easiest ways you can measure your porosity level at home is by conducting a “Float test.”

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1. Simply take a few strands of hair, preferably freshly washed hair, and place the strands in a glass bowl of room temperature water.

2. If the strand/strands sink to the bottom then you have high porosity hair. If the strand/strands float then you have low porosity hair.

So… you know your hair’s porosity level. What next?

Being aware of your hair’s porosity level helps determine not only what products you should use, but it helps you decide what methods of sealing and maintaining moisture you should include in your regimine.

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I am going to conduct a porosity test tonight on my hair and make a separate post tomorrow. I haven’t done a test in a few months, so I am excited about the results!

Do you know your hairs porosity levels? How important is porosity? Have you done a float test?

Share your thoughts and comments below!

Tata, for now!

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Always remember: You are Fearfully, Wonderfully and “Beautifully mane.”

Light Skin vs. Dark skin: Are we at Race War with OURSELVES?

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So, I came across a very compelling article the other day on the web. It was entitled, “10 Unnacceptable cycles Black People have to change.” I will make sure to have the link will be posted below.
The title immediately grabbed my attention, I had to see what this was all about! Scrolling through the list, I saw the cliche stereotypes that our race does seem to hold true such as poverty, crime, sexual promiscuity (For clarification, I am not saying other cultures cannot be held accountable to these stereotypes as well), etc. I came across the eighth thing on the list which was as follows: “Intra racial discrimination”.
Below its title, it stated “We are one community made of up various colors. At no time should we place one complexion over another. Without divisiveness, we are a force.”
 
Powerful. I began to ponder… what did they mean by this? I immediately began to think of all of the “Light skin” vs. “Dark skin” memes I have been witnessing lately. Are we at a stage in our history in which one complexion within black culture gets preferential treatment over the other? Interesting, right.
To fully understand intraracial discrimination and the skin color paradox/color complex within the African American community is an issue that I not only feel very strongly about, but it needs to be addressed.

The United States of America is known WORLDWIDE as the melting pot, made up of various cultures, races, religions, and backgrounds. While in some cultures, diversity isn’t typically embraced as freely, but here? We embrace it, we live it. And it hasn’t always been this way, especially in African American culture.

From the time period in which slavery was abolished, to the Civil Rights movement, to electing our FIRST EVER African American president of the United States, our country has come a long way. Although racism, as we know it, is still present, it is not necessarily PREVALENT. But there is a question that comes to mind… What is the actual meaning behind “racism?”

Sure, there is Racism as we know it, which can be defined by Google as “The belief that all members of each Race possess characteristics or abilities specific to that Race, esp. so as to distinguish it as inferior or superior to another race or races.” This includes stereotypes against races, discriminating against other races, religions, or others who we think are drastically different than us, in a way that we are not accustomed to.
 Historically, you could argue that lighter skinned African-Americans get preferential treatment over darker skinned African-Americans, because they are seen as being closer to white. Unfortunately lighter people have received preferential treatment throughout the years, especially when it comes to educational, employment, and social opportunities. This standard that light-skinned people are treated better than other complexions has inevitably created a divisive skin color paradox, with serious psychological repercussions.
For example, this whole “Light skins be like” and “Dark skins be like” trend on Instagram and other social media avenues. Sure, this trend started off as jokes that DO IN FACT hold truth, but are we discriminating against our own race?
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If I see a African American of a lighter complextion in passing, do I automatically assume they don’t reply to texts, or are more emotional? Is it meant to be light hearted, or is it new age racism?
And don’t even get me started on this whole Drake thing. Saying he’s emotional because he’s light skinned, or that he’s “soft” and everything. Again, these assumptions and stereotypes do hold some truth to them, but when is enough ENOUGH? Are we taking these jokes too far? Is someone bound to get offended? Is it fair to say that we are discriminating against our OWN RACE?
There is no right or wrong answer to this never-ending question; just facts, thoughts, feelings and emotions.  This topic has been heavy on my heart and I would love to hear your comments and thoughts below.
Are we at a race war with ourselves?
Thanks guys!
Always remember: You are Fearfully, Wonderfully and “Beautifully mane.” 

Oh, what a tangled web we… weave?

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You wear a weave, Lizz. YOU WEAR A WEAVE. How can you POSSIBLY be natural if you wear a weave?
 
I’m sure I am not the only one who has heard this. The women who do wear weaves on occasion can attest to getting this question all the time, especially if they consider themselves a natural. In fact, I have gotten it MORE than a few times already since I do currently have a weave on my head.
 
Does wearing a weave/wig mean you don’t love yourself? Is it a form of protective styling? Is it false advertising? What the heck are you hiding under there?!
 
One day, as I was admiring some natural hair bloggers and vloggers online, I came across one who I do consider my hair crush or my hair icon, Taren Guy. Taren916. She’s AWESOME and I watched one of her vlog’s, I believe it was a random one, in which she began to elaborate on how important versatility is in the black community, since she’s gotten some flack on wearing wigs. Is a wig any different then Sengalease twists, or box braids? Is it protective styling, or false advertising? She then went on to define natural hair as simply when you “stop relaxing.”
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I can see her face right now. Any of you Taren916 subbie’s, you know how expressive she is. God, I love her. Watching that truly made me realize and come to the conclusion… Who on Gods green earth said that natural hair had to be one type of hair? One type of hairstyle? What if I want to experiment with Steam Rollers, or even color treatments? Does that make me not natural?
 
My personal definition of natural hair is as follows: Hair when you stop relaxing. Just stop relaxing.  No more creamy crack. And either, you choose to take the route of transitioning your hair and letting your relaxer grow out, or big chopping as the natural hair community is likely to say and cutting off the relaxed or damaged ends and starting all over. Starting fresh! Either way, you are eliminating the process of chemically relaxing your hair.
 
Women like to switch up looks and play around. We love doing this, and we can’t say that men don’t like it either. But when does it begin to be too much? When do we begin to use weaves and wigs as beauty crutches? Yes, there is no relaxer on our heads so we are protective styling… But when does it begin to be, excuse my Tamar Braxton, “team too much”?
 
Personally, I think there is nothing wrong with throwing something on your head when you don’t feel like showing your hair, or you begin to crave some straight hair for a bit. It doesn’t make you any less natural.
 
Embrace versatility! Its your hair, you have earned the right to do what you want with it. Just always remember, We are fearfully, wonderfully and “Beautifully mane.” 🙂
 
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